Italy’s COVID Green Pass – What You Need To Know

We’ve heard the words ‘COVID green pass’ floating about for a while now. It’s something many countries have considered introducing in an effort to curb the spread of COVID-19.

From August 6th, Italy has now introduced a green pass which is required for all public venues. Where exactly does ‘public venues’ include? Pretty much everything. You’ll need this green pass in order to go to the gym, the theater, indoor restaurants, and museums to name but a few.

Italy

The way it works is through a specific app, which gives you a QR code to be scanned upon entry to public venues. The QR code is linked to your vaccinations records, recent test results, or recovery records from COVID in the past. This certificate is available in both paper, and digital forms and both are accepted.

This new green pass is only just starting its rollout, as from September, along with public venues, the green pass will be required for students and staff at Italian schools and universities. No pass? No entry. Simple. If a member of staff fails to show their health pass for five consecutive days, they will be suspended and have their salary frozen. The Italian government is not messing around.

Italy’s Minister of Health, Roberto Speranza said “We are committed to doing our best to reopen schools safely in September and for classes to be in-person. With this new law, we order a compulsory Green Pass as a requirement to access schools for all staff members.”

Another change happening in September is the need for proof of vaccination or negative test result in order to travel long-distance, again through the COVID green pass system. It will be needed for anyone traveling between more than two regions on public transport. That includes planes, trains, buses, and ferries.

You might be wondering what happens to those who don’t abide by the new requirements. A fine of anywhere between €400-€1000. Ouch.

There have been a few protests throughout the nation, with those who are against the new green pass protesting that it affects their freedom and that Italy is turning into a dictatorship. However, the green pass has been widely accepted and supported by most Italian residents, in the hope of restoring some more normality.

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