Lanshan 1 Pro Tent Review

Lanshan 1 Pro Tent Review

The 3F UL Lanshan 1 Pro Tent is an ultralight single-wall trekking-pole tent with a side door and vestibule that can be rolled back in good weather for ventilation and views. The interior has a fully integrated bathtub floor, so you can pitch the tent in the pouring rain and still keep the interior dry. The tent is made with silicone impregnated nylon (silnylon) and must be seam-sealed manually before use in rainy weather. This is an easy process that only takes about 30 minutes to complete and a day or two to dry.

Specs at a Glance

  • Type: Trekking Pole Tent
  • Manufacturer’s Claimed Weight: 24.4 oz / 690 g (includes factory attached guylines)
  • Weight after Seam-Sealing: 24.4 oz / 690 g (includes factory attached guylines..that’s not a mistake. Our tent was obviously lighter than the manufacturer’s specification before seam-sealing)
  • Doors: 1
  • Recommended Pole Height: 120 cm
  • Material:
    • Fly: 20 D double-coated silicon nylon
    • Floor: 20 D PU-Silicon coated nylon Waterproof index: 6000mm
    • Mesh: 15 D Nylon mesh
    • Zipper: YKK #3
  • Minimum # of States to Pitch/Recommended: 6/9

While its design shares many features that are common on other tarp-style tents. the Lanshan 1 Pro is remarkably similar to the Six Moon Designs Lunar Solo. The biggest difference between the two is that the Lanshan 1 Pro is made with silnylon which tends to sag a bit when it gets wet, while the Lunar Solo is made with polyester, which doesn’t. Both tents still need to be seam-sealed to waterproof them and both tents are made in China.

The vestibule doors can be rolled back for airflow and views
The vestibule doors can be rolled back for airflow and views

Tent Exterior

The Lanshan 1 Pro has a large front vestibule, split down the middle with a zipper, for covered gear storage. The bottom of the vestibule does not reach the ground but is raised to facilitate airflow. Single wall tents are prone to tent condensation and the extra airflow helps minimize the amount of moisture that collects on the inside of the tent. There’s also a vent in the peak of the tent to release the warm air the collects near the ceiling and causes internal condensation to form.

I’d recommend using the panel pullouts during setup to increase the interior volume.
I’d recommend using the panel pullouts during setup to increase the interior volume.

The tent requires 6 stakes to pitch at a minimum: 5 on the corners and 1 in front of the vestibule. All of the guyout points, including the peak and panels, are reinforced with UHMWPE-gridstop. While you don’t have to seam-seal the fly corners, you will want to seal the needle holes in the reinforced patches on the peak and panels.

The manufacturer recommends a 120cm trekking pole for the Lanshan 1 Pro
The manufacturer recommends a 120cm trekking pole for the Lanshan 1 Pro.

When you set up a trekking pole tent like this, it’s best the keep the guylines loose when staking it out and then tighten them once you’ve inserted the peak pole. All of the guyout points have lineloc tensioners, which makes this easy. There are additional panel guyout loops on the side and rear wall and I would also recommend using them to increase the tent’s interior space and headroom, particularly in wet conditions.

The tent comes with a repair kit, seam-sealing syringe and mini-groundhog style tent stakes
The tent comes with a repair kit, seam-sealing syringe, and mini-groundhog style tent stakes.

Tent Interior

The Lanshan 1 Pro has a floating bathtub floor that is connected to the tent walls with mesh. This makes it a little easier to pitch the tent on uneven ground while facilitating more airflow through the tent. The rainfly extends out over the mesh so rain hitting the tent exterior doesn’t drip inside the tent, while internal condensation is designed to roll down the interior walls and out through the mesh. This latter feature isn’t that reliable, however, because surface tension often keeps the water from draining through the mesh. Your best bet is to carry a small towel to mop it up if it ends up dripping on the door. It’s only a small quantify of water.

The floor is connected to the tent with breathable mesh.
The floor is connected to the tent with breathable mesh.

The bathtub floor has a five-sided shape, so it fits a rectangular sleeping pad and has space for extra gear storage alongside your pad inside the tent. It’s big enough for a medium-sized dog. There is however, only one small mesh pocket on the interior of the tent, located at one of the ends.

The corners of the floor have guylines that can share a stake with the fly
The corners of the floor have guylines that can share a stake with the fly

The corners of the bathtub floor have guylines attached that can share a stake with the corners of the fly. These interior guylines give the bathtub floor its height, to prevent standing water from entering the tent. It’s a nice detail.

Another view of stake-sharing between the floor the the fly.
Another view of stake-sharing between the floor and the fly.

Packaging

The Lanshan 1 Pro comes with a compression sack, attached guylines, extra guylines, a seam-sealing syringe, and 10 tent stakes. You do need to purchase silicone-based seam-sealer separately though. We dilute ours 50/50 with white gas so that it soaks into the seams more easily and then paint it on with a small brush.

The Lanshan 1 packs down very small in its included compression sack.
The Lanshan 1 packs down very small in its included compression sack.

The Lanshan 1 Pro packs up quite small when it’s stuffed into its stuff sack, making it very easy to carry in a smaller volume backpack.

Recommendation

The 3F UL Lanshan 1 Pro ($155) is a solid value for the money. While silnylon tents have been somewhat eclipsed by ones made with polyester because they don’t stretch when they get wet, silnylon is still a highly packable fabric that will last a long time with proper care. While there is some benefit to buying a polyester Six Moon Designs Lunar Solo ($230) instead, the Lanshan 1 Pro is still a perfectly good tent in its own right. If you’re on a tight budget or you want to try using a single wall tent without going bankrupt, the Lanshan 1 Pro is a good option.

Disclosure: The author purchased this product.

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